Who is Allen Greene (In Memory of) from Shawshank Redemption?

Who is Allen Greene

Allen Greene was a literary agent for the director Frank Darabont and a close friend of his. He worked on getting the rights for the film and died just before the film was released.

He was 3 time Academy Award-nominated director Frank Darabont’s agent. The Film Shawshank Redemption is dedicated to him. The credit for him is at the very end of the movie.

Is Allen Greene from the movie The Shawshank Redemption a real person?

Allen Greene was a real person. I was in high school with him. He graduated from North Greene High School in White Hall, IL in 1971.

The name of the school district and the county in which it is located are named after the Greene family from which he descended.

I was a few years behind him in school but I remember in those days, he owned a movie camera and he and his friends were “making movies” even then. He was very interested in working in the film industry.

Allen Greene was a former agent and close personal friend of Frank Darabont (the movie director).

Allen Greene
Allen Greene

Greene helped Darabont get the directing gig at Castle Rock Entertainment but he died about a month before the film was released, due to complications of HIV/AIDS.

Allen Greene acted in Shawshank Redemption Movie and left a mesmerizing impression on the audience.

In his real-life, he is a baseball and basketball athlete and also served as a director for the University of Buffalo, and Assistant Athletic Director at the University of Mississippi.

Allen Greene was born in Washington and completed his schooling there. Later on, Allen shifted to different cities for his baseball love.

He was suffering from AIDS-related complications during the Shawshank Redemption movie, and couldn’t last till the completion of the film.

At the end of the film, Allen Greene received special thanks for his contribution to the film.

Is Shawshank redemption true?

I watched this movie today and I have realized just one thing. Beside andy’s hope and patience, there was one big thing in favor of him!!

That was his ROOM!!! which is at the end of row.. that is if his room was somewhere in between the rooms of other prisoners.

He would never even think about the tunnel.. because if he tried to do so… he would end up in another prison room, not on the outside of Shawshank.

That’s why it was meant to be because his room does him a big favor, from where he is able to undermine the tunnel and escape Shawshank!!

In the movie “The Shawshank Redemption”, why didn’t they change Andy’s cell for 20 years?

The movie is actually an adaptation of a story by Stephen King titled “Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption”. According to that, he actually had a roommate for a short period of time.

Coming to the movie, although he has the same cell from the start, even if the prison did have a cell rotation policy, it’s quite possible that Andy, being a key player in the warden’s money-laundering scheme, was allowed to retain the cell through his time.

Also, there is no reference to having cellmates by any of the inmates throughout the movie.

Having said that, it took him time to influence the warden and have that cell. The rock hammer was initially bought by him for the purpose of his hobby, not tunnel digging.

Andy didn’t set out to dig the tunnel right from the word go, it just started when a chunk of the wall fell out while he was etching his name on it and he realized the possibility of such an option.

Even after that, he had to be sure the warden would let him keep Rita Hayworth’s poster, and only then could he start off with the arduous process of scraping away behind it.

I also read a suggestion somewhere that he had bribed the warden into having a cozy cell at the end of the line without any disturbance, but that kind of seems out of character.

You can always be skeptical about it and find holes in the whole thing, but this issue seems pretty genuine. After all, even Alexander Dumas’ whole plot rests on the concept of having the same cell.

Sidney Applebaum

Following a modestly successful release in 1994, The Shawshank Redemption has gone on to become one of the most beloved and acclaimed movies ever made. It often sits at number one atop IMDb’s list of the top 250 movies of all time (as voted on by users), outranking even The Godfather, Schindler’s List, and The Dark Knight.

With performances for the ages from Tim Robbins as quiet, new inmate Andy Dufresne and Morgan Freeman as wizened lifer Red, it’s a simply told, deeply affecting drama set in the imposing Shawshank prison. But at its core, this is a film about the impossibility of caging the human spirit. It’s a movie about hope. So get busy livin’, or get busy readin’ these little known facts about The Shawshank Redemption.

allen greene shawshank redemption
allen greene shawshank redemption

Dozens of books and stories by Stephen King have been turned into movies and TV miniseries, but The Shawshank Redemption is one of the very few that isn’t in the horror genre. It’s based on Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption, one of the four novellas that comprise the 1982 collection Different Seasons.

The collection also includes the thriller Apt Pupil, which became a film in 1998, and the coming-of-age drama The Body, which Rob Reiner turned into Stand by Me. In fact, the only section of Different Seasons that hasn’t been adapted for the screen is The Breathing Method, a non-horror story that involves a woman giving birth…while decapitated.

While many filmmakers have put Stephen King’s stories onto celluloid, the author hasn’t always been a fan of these adaptations. For example, he disliked Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 version of The Shining, finding Kubrick’s characterization of Wendy (Shelley Duvall) to be misogynistic. Nevertheless, he encourages new filmmakers to adapt his work by offering young directors the rights to his short stories for just one dollar.

In the early 80s, Frank Darabont paid his buck to adapt “The Woman in the Room.” He then gained some screenwriter cred by writing films like A Nightmare on Elm Street 3 and 1988’s The Blob.

Bolstered by his success in the business, Darabont approached King again, only this time asking about Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption.

Evidently, King enjoyed Darabont’s take on “The Woman in the Room” so much that he sold the Shawshank rights for a mere $1,000. However, King never even cashed the check. Instead, he had it framed and gave it back to Darabont as a gift.

Read More: The untold truth of The Shawshank Redemption

allen greene shawshank redemption

Poonam Deswal

I am a new blogger from New York (USA). Helping people to get information online.

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